The Last Laugh by Paul D. Brazill

If you enjoy a bit of tasty crime, but have never read Paul D. Brazill, then this collection of short stories is an excellent opportunity to do a little covert exploration into the dark underbelly of his seedy, but seductive world. Guns, gangsters, old geezers with grudges and whores without hearts proliferate his pages; luring you in, before taking you down. With twenty mouth-wateringly delicious crime stories to choose from – how could you possibly lose?

german-rings-with-skull  aA stealthy aside, about the writer himself: The tremendously talented jazz musician, Miles Davis, once said “If you are going to tell a story, man, you’ve got to give it some attitude; don’t be coy with that shit.” And if this is the type of commitment you demand from your own personal reading material; then Paul D. Brazill is your man. In this exceptionally exciting crime collection, being coy is the last thing you could ever accuse him of. Not that I would like to try…

2015-Whole-Body-Blood-Scared-Others-Halloween-Cosplay-Lace-And-Polyester-White-And-Red-Blood-MiserableBut on a more serious note, there are plenty of things happening here, that Paul D. Brazill should be held accountable for: a blood spattered bride, vicious vendettas and a dead pimp in a trunk, to name but a few. And not only these – the list of his serious literary crimes increases rapidly with each twisted tale. But you don’t need to take my unreliable word for it – you can check out this superior collection for yourself.

Interested? Then let’s seal the deal, and if my female persuasion and covert manipulation have not seduced you into downloading a copy right now, then with all due respect, stop wasting my time, as The Last Laugh is most definitely on you!

 

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Amazon.com     Amazon.co.uk

 

The Death Of Three Colours by Jason Michel

Jason Michel’s unique writing speciality is the character on the verge of mental meltdown. In his latest novella, The Death Of Three Colours, Jonah is a man existing at the brittle edge of rapidly disintegrating economic and cultural system. His interactions with the rest of humanity consist almost entirely of an allegiance to a tightly-knit group of petty criminals, drug dealers, and their associated wives and girlfriends. The normally independent Jonah, who has enough existential angst to fuel an entire John Paul Sartre novel, becomes drawn into the groups’ ambitious new plans to expand their drugs empire internationally using the internet, from the relative comfort of the run down pub where they all, regularly meet.

Jonah is a closet internet entrepreneur, who can envisage a somewhat frightening future with new currencies on the Dark Web, and his skills prove to be invaluable to the business. With his help, the band of the disparate petty criminals can foresee a future in which their careers are about to progress to the big time. Unfortunately, given their ages, average intelligence level, and the clashing of overblown male egos, this isn’t necessarily a good thing.

As mentioned earlier, Michel’s characters are never entirely, psychologically sound. Jonah’s psyche is fragmented and he wrestles daily with his wicked alter ego Milton, whom he is barely able to control. Milton is a violent, vicious, misogynist and the nearest this guy is ever going to get to paradise is in the acts of fulfilling his own monstrous needs.

Don’t be fooled into believing that this is a simplistic Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde type of situation, as Jonah/Milton is fully aware of his psychological condition –  so, don’t expect a shocking reveal moment of the type found in Fight Club. At times Milton can be useful, and Jonah is prepared to acknowledge this, although the idea of dependence on the caged monster inside of his head fills him with shame.

Jonah is no angel either, when he is not dabbling in the Dark Web his world is ruled by his two overriding obsessions. The first of which, and predictably male, is sex, but his character has matured enough by now, to welcome a relationship into which he can ‘share his inner world’, without the need of painful medical intervention. So along comes Sally and he is looking pretty set. Unfortunately Sally has enough historical baggage to comprise everything he has been working towards: is she a dangerous femme fatale?

His second obsession is of the mystical goddess variety. No, he isn’t trying to upgrade his girlfriend; this Mexican folklore saint literally rules his world. Not only does he worship her but he fantasizes about sleeping with her too. (I know, I know, typical male behaviour).  But the scene in which this happens is far from ordinary as Jonah is seeking sexual perfection in the form of a transcendent, ethereal and orgasmic state in which he can reside forever. That might not seem too shabby for a year or two, you might think, even if his chosen goddess is skeletal and not traditionally attractive by most peoples standards –But a word to the wise – passion between the gods, saints and humans rarely ends well and Santa Muerte, also known as the goddess of death, is a demanding and vengeful mistress…

Captura de pantalla 2012-10-16 a la(s) 18.03.13 (1)

I don’t often do book reviews, and this one is the first on my site, so why now and why this particular novella, you may be wondering? I chose this book as it a terrific read! I loved the dark, poetic prose, the Mexican mythology (or alternate religion), and the exciting plot with plenty of twists and turns, with characters I could emotionally invest in. Best of all though, was the cruel undercurrent of deliciously dark humor that runs stealthily all of the way through it.

This is a crime / horror novel and I must in all conscience include a mild warning for potential, psychologically unsound and emotionally unstable readers – prolonged reading usage may cause addiction, and in recommending this book, I am not prepared to take on any personal responsibility for that situation… You can read The Death Of Three Colours by Jason Michel, entirely your own risk! Links below…

Jason
The Death Of Three Colours at  Amazon.com   Amazon.co.uk

 

 

 

Buried In The Hills – Free Promotoion

My novel, Buried In The Hills is a murder mystery set in the not-so-sleepy village of Vorokvadia, Cyprus. The fictional village is a combination of my own village Oroklini and the neighboring village of Lvadia. The photos, above, are of places which feature in my novel; it is a beautiful Cypriot village with the hills rising behind it descending to the seashore in front. The village has a lot of old world charm as well as its fair share of stories, some of which have been incorporated into this fictional story.

The village has a easy going, forgiving nature, but cross the boundaries of what is a considered to be acceptable and old style village justice may emerge, which can be just as real now as it was in the past. There is a saying in the village that “nobody knows how many bodies are buried in hills,” and that was the inspiration for this story….

The novel, which is the second featuring my detective D.I.FLynn reads as a stand alone novel – so it’s not necessary to have read the first in order to enjoy the second.

If you would like a FREE copy then please follow the links to Amazon: I  do hope you enjoy it!

Free at Amazon.com

Free at Amazon.co.uk

Praise for Buried In The Hills:

“This is a good read, folks! Fast paced and well written, held my interest to the end. Hope the author will do more with DI Flynn.”
“Brilliant”
“A great mystery”

The book is currently: 

#2,249 Free in Kindle Store (Amazon.uk)

and in the top 100 crime, mystery, thriller Amazon .com

Literary Prescription

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

This unusual science fiction novel is set in a boarding school in East Sussex in England. It is clear from the beginning of the story, that there is something deeply disturbing happening at the school. The children are forced to take precious care of their health; they are not taught any normal life skills, but are encouraged by their teachers, ‘the guardians’ to produce art and poetry, which is taken away by the mysterious ‘Madame. It is gradually revealed, that the children are clones, and their sole purpose is to have their organs harvested for transplants for ‘normal’ citizens. The three main characters, Kathy, Ruth and Tommy, develop close bonds which resonate throughout the novel; Kathy and Tommy sharing a deep love and attraction, which is deliberately thwarted by Ruth. Kathy becomes ‘a carer,’ looking after the clones who have already had surgery, while her friends ‘complete,’ meaning they have no further usable organs to donate. The novel presents a terrifyingly bleak picture of lives which are considered to be less than human. It is a poignant and beautifully written story.

Read more…